Sunday, October 15, 2017

Jungle survival: bamboo lashing

OK, this ain't pretty, but it's effective. If you're lashing bamboo and it's slippery, tie a bit of rope above the next highest 'node' (joint) to hold it in place.

Bamboo lashing jungle survival shelter building

Friday, October 13, 2017

Jungle survival: termite mound uses

Termite mounds are a good thing to find in a survival situation. You can smear the termites on your skin as mosquito repellent. You can eat termites. Termite mounds make really good campfire fuel.
Also, you can sprinkle termites in creeks to draw fish into your trap/net.

Termite mound uses for survival

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Survival kit item: candles

'Magic' candles are a very nice addition to your fire kit in your survival kit. The weigh almost nothing, cost almost nothing, and they stay lit for a long time... even in windy condition.

They are ideal survival kit items.


survival kit candles

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Wild edible fruit: Elephant Apple - Dillenia indica

The Elephant Apple (Dillenia indica) is fairly common in the jungles of SE Asia. Nutritionally speaking, 100 grams of Elephant Apple has about 140 calories, it's 8% protein, 2% to 3% fat, has about 15 grams of calcium, 25 grams of Phosphorus, and 5 mg of Vitamin C.

It's also known as a blood cleanser that's good for your liver and kidneys. Additionally, the tannin is good for treating digestive disorders.

Wild edible fruit Elephant Apple Dillenia indica

Monday, October 9, 2017

Survival tip: best way to build a campfire in the tropics

A very necessary skill for getting a fire going strongly is to add oxygen. Cup your hand, blow into your hands and guide the wind towards the base of the fire. Get down low so you blow at the base. Blowing from above does not get the same results.
The blowing should be a crescendo of wind volume, in other words, start of lightly and increase the velocity as you blow. Take a very short breath in and repeat until the fire has a strong base of fire/coals.

best way to build a campfire in the tropics
The best way to get a campfire going is to blow an increasing amount of wind directly into the base of the fire. Start slow and increase the velocity of your wind.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Jungle survival fire kindling

In addition to fire starter material, it make a lot of sense to carry some early stage fuel such as split bamboo. I carry a pill bottle full of pre-split bamboo sticks. 

I put a silica desiccant pack in the bottle too, so that the sticks stay as dry as possible. 

split bamboo dry campfire kindling
Split dried bamboo to store in a pill box.  You can't have too much dry fuel, especially during the rainy season. 

survival fire kindling bamboo container
Put as much as you can in the bottle.  You could add some strips of inner tube rubber or cotton balls to stuff the bottle.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Collecting wild food: oysters on mangrove roots

Not the easiest way to get food, but oysters on mangrove roots don't run or swim away at least. You have to be very careful when gathering them and wet skin and razor sharp oyster shells are a recipe for cuts.

Collecting wild oysters from mangrove roots
Oysters on mangrove roots are not easy to collect, but there are a lot of them, so if you are very careful you can gather a lot of food.